D-Day Celebrations Have Me Thinking About Patriotism

I don’t come from a military family, nor was I raised with any real political discussion or  thoughts about country. Yet, in my twenties I started paying attention to history and even more so in the last decade, I’ve grown to be highly patriotic. There was no significant reason why other than maturing enough to realize that we truly live in a great nation and freedom really isn’t free.Catching a bit of the D-Day celebrations on the news yesterday once again touched my heart and mind. Veterans who served 75 years ago had patriotism – a love of country – and understanding of history and the importance of serving that is lacking in contemporary society. Our 20-somethings struggle to answer questions such as, “What is D-Day?” “When was WWII and why did it start?” My own 20-somethings included.

Even us 50-somethings can’t fully relate to some of the news tag lines from yesterday:

My grandmother widowed at 18. She still feels that grave loss 75 years after D-Day.

We had to go down and clean up the bodies on the beaches because we had new troops coming in.

When service transcended party: D-Day, my dad and Gen. Dwight Eisenhower.

War is terrible. Tragic. D-Day was those things. It also was heroic and necessary. Younger generations of Americans won’t understand what happened on June 6, 1944, unless they are inspired to learn it.Years ago when I started talking politics and studying history, I brought topics into my college classroom, encouraging students to be engaged. They were. I learned that there is a big difference between reading your 6th grade textbook and bringing history and politics to life by making a practical connection to modern living. I also raised my kids to be politically engaged in the last few years and encourage all young adults to study and understand why they believe what they profess to believe.  In a world where taking time to read, learn and pay attention longer than five minutes is rare, I’m going to take six minutes (wink) and continue talking to my 20-somethings about history and its relevance to our future as Americans.

The next chance to really celebrate this amazing nation is July 4th (and of course wear red, white and blue on Flag Day, June 14th!). I plan to take time to honor our nation and thank those who serve.

Happy Weekend to All! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

27 thoughts on “D-Day Celebrations Have Me Thinking About Patriotism

  1. I was raised to be patriotic and ever thankful to live in this “land of the free and home of the brave.” Added to that aspect of my life is the fact that my husband served in the military and so I was a military wife. It is a life very different from the norm, but I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything. So the 75th anniversary of D-Day caused much reflection in our household.

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    • As a military wife, we also honor you. Behind every serviceman/woman is usually a family support system who often make sacrifices too. You must have wonderful stories and memories of those years. Hope you are doing well💕🇺🇸🙏🏻.

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  2. That was beautiful and all the comments are so thoughtful and expressive of patriotic hearts. These kind of things have to be real and not contrived and I’m so glad there are those good things that are happening and many heroes are being honored now rather than never; they deserve it! They gave their all, even our founding fathers gave everything so we could be free.
    So thankful also that we have a President who recognizes true heroic valor and gives honor where honor is due and thanks for the sacrifices made for us. It has really made a difference and I believe where people are waking up to truth our true worth in the country that we have been blessed to live in will really show its true colors; Red, White, and Blue. The prayers that are going up before the Almighty are being heard and He will rescue us again!

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    • Amen! I agree that the comments here have been expressive of patriotic hearts and genuine gratitude and care for our country. I appreciate your contribution to the discussion as well.🇺🇸

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  3. I don’t know how to comment. It’s horrifying how few young people understand or even care about history. Those who do find the notion of laying down their lives to save those who don’t difficult but I’m sure they’d make the sacrifice before … those idiots who probably couldn’t find Europe on a map. I have been to the beaches of Normandy and spoken to survivors who remembered. Yes, I’m old. I think fighting evil and inhumanity drove them more than patriotism. I think their moral values (which used to be American moral values) meant more. Those values we are losing as a country. Thus the decline of what you call patriotism.

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    • Yes, it’s concerning how each generation understands less and less about American history (& geography!). Rallying against evil and inhumanity used to be common American values… How amazing that you met survivors and have those first-hand accounts of what occurred. Thank you for sharing your thoughts🇺🇸.

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  4. I don’t come from a military family either and in the past these important days just passed me by. However this year I took the time to watch a documentary about D-Day and it really got to me! I went through plenty of tissues watching these men talk about what they went through.

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    • It’s so good that these types of documentaries are still being made. They are especially powerful when the actual veterans give their personal accounts of the events.🇺🇸🇺🇸

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  5. It’s so important that we teach history in our schools again. The basis should start in elementary schools. Unfortunately the emphasis there is test prep. Before I retired I was actually having to sneak in science and social studies lessons and pray the principal didn’t walk in. 😞 As a child I remember the classes all went downtown to watch the Memorial Day parade. Then as a teacher in the early 1980’s, the elementary school I taught at had a patriotic program each year with every class presenting a song, poem, dance, etc. to celebrate the U.S. A.! 🇺🇸Where are our displays of patriotism now? Thank you for this post that highlights some of the sacrifices made for freedom.

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    • How sad that science and social studies had to be sneaked in! Our country would do well to again include patriotic programs in the schools. Your comment reminds me of the patriotic songs that we sang in our youth! How unfortunate that schools no longer set aside time for these very important acts of honoring our country and history.

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  6. Patriotism never should be out of style! We are so blessed to live in a free country. And we owe an eternal debt of gratitude to all who fought to keep it that way, and all who work to preserve our democracy today.

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  7. I agree. It is hard to watch people act like our country needs to be spit on for them to be considered cool or trendy or “politically correct”. What happened? We can say there are issues without spitting on the good that is here. In my time in newspapers I interviewed several World War II veterans. What amazing men and their sacrifices can never really be understood. By telling their stories we keep them and what they did for this country alive. Thank you for being a part of that effort.

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    • I’m not sure what happened either but the cultural climate has changed toward patriotism. How interesting and special that you’ve met and interviewed several of our heros. Thank you for your thoughtful comments here.🇺🇸

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I’ve been watching the ceremonies every night after work, and it’s really quite an emotional feeling that washes over me. So many young people volunteered to fight a menace in Europe and gave their lives up at such an early age. Truly heroic deeds.

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